I was sent a link to Dr. Stackhouse’s blog this morning by someone on staff here. He has recently written an interesting blog calling for a higher level of musicianship and lyric writing from worship leaders, specifically calling out Chris Tomlin. Here’s the link, it’s worth a read. I certainly don’t agree with everything and some of it really bothers me, but that’s ok… it’s good to hear what other people are thinking about these things.

Some of the comments are quite good too. My personal fav’s are #58 by J.D. Walt and #65 by Zach Nielsen. I also put a comment on it (#66), and was tempted to respond to Dr. Guretzki’s comparison with critiquing Window’s Vista (#8), but I thought I should get back to work.

On second thought, I’ll post one of Tomlin’s lyrics which I really do appreciate:

From the highest of heights to the depths of the sea
Creation’s revealing Your majesty
From the colors of fall to the fragrance of spring
Every creature unique in the song that it sings
All exclaiming

Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name.
You are amazing God
All powerful, untameable,
Awestruck we fall to our knees as we humbly proclaim
You are amazing God

Who has told every lightning bolt where it should go
Or seen heavenly storehouses laden with snow
Who imagined the sun and gives source to its light
Yet conceals it to bring us the coolness of night
None can fathom
Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name.
You are amazing God
All powerful, untameable,
Awestruck we fall to our knees as we humbly proclaim
You are amazing God
Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name.
You are amazing God
Incomparable, unchangeable
You see the depths of my heart and You love me the same
You are amazing God
You are amazing God

I think this is a good example of using creative imagery in the verses, and got me thinking about (and worshipping) God in a different way than any other song I’ve heard has done before. Is there a hymn written that says the same thing? Probably, but I can’t recall one.  Is it a perfect song? Definately not – it’s hard to sing and lead congregationally, and there are a few of the lyrics that i’m not crazy about. But all in all, I appreciate it and think it’s better than 95% of the songs that people are writing today. And that’s how it always goes, 99% of the songs that are written won’t ever be sung in a church, and 95% of the stuff that makes it into the church won’t last more than 10 years. I’m glad the best material naturally sticks around in all areas of art, and I’m interested to see what of the songs I’m singing and writing now are worth singing when I have kids who are my age.